Aug 21




Welcome to the main page of my website. My name is David Cherie, and I have been practicing law for a number of years. During that time, I oversaw the learning that took place during the internship of many law school graduates. I always made a point of acquainting those interns with the qualities of a good lawyer. I wanted my interns to display those same qualities, whenever they met with one of my clients.

If you choose to contact my law firm, you too will benefit from the qualities that I instill into my interns, and into the habits of all the people who work with me. I intend to spell out those qualities on this web page.

Law Firm - Justice

First, a good lawyer must have the ability to communicate, both orally and on paper. A lawyer is a professional. He or she should not use any sort of crass or even “hip” language. A lawyer must state everything clearly and simply.

Next, a good lawyer demonstrates the ability to think logically. A good lawyer knows when and how to “make his (or her) case.” A good lawyer can aid a client by seeing the logic behind a particular move in a courtroom. A good lawyer understands when it pays to make a logical move, a move that others might have failed to anticipate.

A good lawyer should excel at dealing with people. A lawyer repeatedly meets with and talks with various people. A lawyer should feel ready to think about what it means to “wear the shoes” of the client with whom he or she is talking.

In the late 1980s, one lawyer in Los Angeles County was invited to take on a car accident case for a woman with a ventricular shunt. At one point, he questioned the soundness of the woman’s case. He suggested that she might be asked why, in view of her medical condition, she did not wear two seat belts.

That lawyer failed to consider what it might mean to go through life always worried about how your medical condition might cause unanticipated problems. Remember, it took the automobile industry many years to accept the proposal for mandatory seatbelts. I would never want one of my interns to address a client in the way that this one lawyer spoke to this one female client.

When dealing with people, a good lawyer must show a complete understanding of the situation. A good lawyer needs to be able to see both sides of any argument. The lawyer mentioned above had the ability to see both sides of his client’s argument. He did not, however, do a decent job of conveying to her the possible implications of claims that might be introduced by an opposing attorney.

A good lawyer needs to be flexible. A lawyer can expect to be dealing with a wide variety of legal issues. A respected lawyer feels prepared to get to the bottom of all sorts of legal questions. This is the type of lawyer that I want to have working for me.

Aug 21




Not everyone can rattle off all of the local ordinances that have been set down in law. Firm understanding of the law, however, should be demonstrated by any legal professional. In fact, a conscientious judge will expect any lawyer in his or her courtroom to display such an understanding. A good law firm makes a point of hiring only lawyers who will meet the criterion that has been established by courtroom judges.

With that fact in mind, anyone who goes looking for a legal representation needs, on at least one front, to remain firm. Law specifics, i.e. the technicalities of the law ought to be thoroughly understood by anyone who claims to be a legal professional. In other words, anyone who pays money to a law firm has a right to demand a total understanding of the law.

What does that mean? Does that mean that a law firm must be ready to guarantee a certain outcome for any given set of circumstances? No, it does not. It means that the members of a good law firm never hesitate to research all the facts behind any legal question. The members of a good law firm do not shy away from spending hours in a library, studying all of  the legal precedents that relate to whatever case is before, or about to go before a judge.

A good law firm also knows when it needs to call in an expert. Suppose, for example, that a law firm is approached by a female client, one who claims that she has developed mesothelioma following exposure to asbestos, asbestos in the walls of the building where she works. If that law firm wants to take on this case, it should consider hiring both a health and environmental expert.

Now, when a law firm hires an expert, then, of course, it needs to pay that expert. A money-pinching law firm might not want to pay the salary of an expert. That firm might then proceed without access to important expertise. That firm would stand little chance of winning any case that it presented in court. That fact underscores the reason that you want to be careful, when and if you shop for a law firm.

Law issues can cause both sides of any legal question to undergo constant changes. A firm that offers good legal representation should be willing to remain updated on those changes. Such a firm needs to hire lawyers and paralegals that are willing to do a good deal of library research. Such a firm plans to use research to “get the jump on” any opposing lawyer.

If a law firm fails to do a sufficient amount of research, then an opposing lawyer could well introduce new and unexpected facts, while a case is before the judge. Such a scenario could spell doom for the person who has hired the less than perfect law firm.

Heed the information provided above. Make sure that you do not allow yourself to “play the role” of that sadly doomed person.

What to Expect from a Law Firm

Not everyone can rattle off all of the local ordinances that have been set down in law. Firm understanding of the law, however, should be demonstrated by any legal professional. In fact, a conscientious judge will expect any lawyer in his or her courtroom to display such an understanding. A good law firm makes a point of hiring only lawyers who will meet the criterion that has been established by courtroom judges.

With that fact in mind, anyone who goes looking for a legal representation needs, on at least one front, to remain firm. Law specifics, i.e. the technicalities of the law ought to be thoroughly understood by anyone who claims to be a legal professional. In other words, anyone who pays money to a law firm has a right to demand a total understanding of the law.

What does that mean? Does that mean that a law firm must be ready to guarantee a certain outcome for any given set of circumstances? No, it does not. It means that the members of a good law firm never hesitate to research all the facts behind any legal question. The members of a good law firm do not shy away from spending hours in a library, studying all of the legal precedents that relate to whatever case is before, or about to go before a judge.

A good law firm also knows when it needs to call in an expert. Suppose, for example, that a law firm is approached by a female client, one who claims that she has developed mesothelioma following exposure to asbestos, asbestos in the walls of the building where she works. If that law firm wants to take on this case, it should consider hiring both a health and environmental expert.

Now, when a law firm hires an expert, then, of course, it needs to pay that expert. A money-pinching law firm might not want to pay the salary of an expert. That firm might then proceed without access to important expertise. That firm would stand little chance of winning any case that it presented in court. That fact underscores the reason that you want to be careful, when and if you shop for a law firm.

Law issues can cause both sides of any legal question to undergo constant changes. A firm that offers good legal representation should be willing to remain updated on those changes. Such a firm needs to hire lawyers and paralegals that are willing to do a good deal of library research. Such a firm plans to use research to “get the jump on” any opposing lawyer.

If a law firm fails to do a sufficient amount of research, then an opposing lawyer could well introduce new and unexpected facts, while a case is before the judge. Such a scenario could spell doom for the person who has hired the less than perfect law firm.

Heed the information provided above. Make sure that you do not allow yourself to “play the role” of that sadly doomed person.

Aug 21




If you have a personal computer, you have probably typed many different words into the box next to the word “search.” “Attorney” may well have been one of those words. Many people get themselves “in a corner” and discover that they feel compelled to find a attorney.

Law

Now anyone who puts this in the box next to “search”: “attorney,” can expect to gain access to an attorney directory. Indeed such a directory has been of help to a number of those who wanted to find attorneys in a given area. Usually, however, an attorney directory offers little help to someone who lives in a rather isolated area. Such a directory might offer the name of only one or two near-by attorneys.

Someone who lives in a rather isolated area might have to rely on “word of mouth.” Someone who lives in an isolated area might want to go online and look for comments from members of the legal profession, or comments from anyone who happened to have had a legal problem similar to that of the isolated and “cornered” individual.

Today, the many social networking sites can help an isolated individual to make contact with someone who has said farewell to all past legal problems, someone who can guide the isolated individual to a wise and trusted attorney. A careful examination of blogs can also help an isolated person to find an appropriate and dependable attorney.

Yet isolated individuals do not represent the only cornered souls who are known to make an effort to find attorneys. Even residents of a big city can often need more than just the names in an online directory of attorneys. In any big city, there are sure to be a number of immigrants or permanent residents. Such people usually prefer to have an attorney who is familiar with the customs and culture of their homeland.

The information that can guide a such an individual, as he or she looks for a lawyer, does not always appear in an attorney directory. There might, for instance be a local attorney who has a well trained intern, an intern that could be of real assistance to the person in need of legal help. That intern might be, for example, the child of a couple that comes from the same country as the person who is in need of legal aid.

Since such information does not appear in a directory, a person who wants an attorney that is familiar with a certain culture ought to establish informal contact with others in the legal profession. Someone who does not want to talk directly to a lawyer might want to approach a paralegal. In that way, the person who needs a lawyer could access information that he or she would probably never find by going online.

By following one of the above procedures, anyone who is “in a corner” can respond to this inner command: “find a attorney.” He or she can discover the legal professional who can be of greatest assistance.